Densho Ebisu has a customer registration policy.
We ask that customers register upon visiting the restaurant.
Cancellation Policy
Please understand that we charge a 50% cancellation fee for cancellations the day prior to a reservation, and a 100% cancellation fee for same-day cancellations.

Ebisu’s Devotion to Detail

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Interior Guide

Counter Seating(seats 12)

Countertop

Made of pure domestically grown Japanese cypress, our countertop boasts a stunning 9.5-m length.

Lighting

Originally designed lighting stretching out for 9 m.
Lighting of this length is a rare sight.

Ceiling

Laid out above the counter seating is a ceiling of 700 latticed beams.
Each 5-by-2.7 cm beam was installed at a slope by craftsmen by hand, leaving a space of 13 mm between each.

Private Room(seats 8)

Walls (white portion): washi wallpaper

Traditional Japanese washi paper treated to enable its use as wallpaper was laid in place one sheet at a time.

Walls (black portion): slate sheet

The slate sheet, with a charm resembling an iron plate that has shifted color with age, has some coloration that looks like white smoke. This coloration appears naturally during production, giving each sheet a different expression, and its own deeply unique character.

Semi-private Room(seats 4)

Walls (White&black portion): washi wallpaper

Traditional Japanese washi paper treated to enable its use as wallpaper was laid in place one sheet at a time.

Floor (same as front counter wooden paneling): flooring with naguri finish

Naguri, a wood-finishing technique critical to the architecture of tea rooms and tea ceremony arbors.
This technique, which adds character to logs and wooden sheets by leaving indentations with tools, was implemented on the wooden paneling used here.

Walls (black portion): washi wallpaper

The black ink base and plasterwork finish gives the wall a speckled appearance.

Densho Ebisu the Finest Materials

Entrance

Plasterer(Virtual rammed earth wall)

Hanchiku, or rammed earth, is a traditional method of construction passed down from ancient Japan.
Using earth as a building material and powerfully ramming it into place, it is a method that gradually builds up its sturdy earthen walls from its foundation.
Inspired by this method, Ebisu’s walls are made with two colors, black and gray.

Signage: Porcelain
A work by the female potter Akiko Geirin.

Garden

A stone wall made in the castle-style piling method that shows off the stones’ natural charm, and two waterfalls that give depth to the view. Enjoy the scenery of the four seasons with the beautiful colors of the Japanese red pine, Japanese maple, and weeping cherry.

Front Counter

Countertop

An iron material with a black film on its surface called kurokawa.
The black shade that gleams a faint blue and its unique texture are behind this material’s appeal.

Wooden Paneling

Naguri, a wood-finishing technique critical to the architecture of tea rooms and tea ceremony arbors.
This technique, which adds character to logs and wooden sheets by leaving indentations with tools, was implemented on the wooden paneling used here.

Floor / Hall Walls / Walls to Left and Right of Counter

Finishing Materials: Ibushi tiles

Materials from Koyoseiga Co., a pottery in Himeji, Hyogo Pref., with a history that dates back to its creation in the twelfth year of the Taisho era.
The roof tiles used in the Heisei restoration of the grand keep of Himeji Castle, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, were made by Koyoseiga.
Their work has been used in the restorations of many important cultural properties that require high precision, such as the restorations of Tatsuno Castle, Izushi Castle, Oshio Tenmangu Shrine, and Kamo Shrine.
They also construct special tiles for many shrines, temples, fortresses, and castles.
With their construction techniques of the traditional Japanese materials of Ibushi tiles, we used their products everywhere for the floors and walls.